What Lies Beneath?

Do you sometimes wonder what is really going on? As the furore around the planned 5-day strikes by junior doctors unfolds, with all the clamour and the noise, the positioning, the power plays, the arguments and the counter-arguments, I wonder where is the truth amidst the madness? How have we reached a stage in which the government and an army of medics, surgeons and psychiatrists are at such loggerheads? What lies beneath all of this?

 

Theresa May, our Prime Minister tell us that “doctors have never had it so good” – I wonder when she last shadowed a Senior Registrar for Acute Medicine on a Friday night in an understaffed hospital? Jeremy Hunt tells us that he is a modern day Aneurin Bevan (I wonder what AB would think of that?!), whilst his shadow counter-part, Diane Abbott retorts that this is a ridiculous suggestion. The PM and the Secretary of State for Health both agree that the junior doctors are playing politics, something the other side refutes, but all agree that this is a disaster and patients lives may well be put at risk. The right wing press tell us it is all about pay and that the doctors are being greedy, whilst the left wing press tell us it is all about an underlying agenda to privatise the NHS. The Junior Doctors admit that some of this is about pay (who would want a significant pay cut for working long and unsociable hours?) but that it is more about resisting a policy to deliver a 24/7, 7/7 NHS, which they believe to be unaffordable and unstaffable due to shortages in funding and recruitment. Senior colleagues appear to be split down the middle in terms of support for the strikes, patient groups are understandably concerned and yet a solution does not appear to be forthcoming.

 

Shouting, anger, fighting, noise, name-calling, power-plays, hate and hollering. So, who will seek the welfare of the people and the nation? Who will make for peace? Both sides tell us this is what they are doing and this is why they stand their ground. The government apparently want to deliver the same standard of service throughout the 7 day week. The Junior Doctors say they are the ones really standing up for the people by resisting that which is unsafe and unfair.

 

So, let us learn from the peacemakers to find a way through. In apartheid South Africa, peace was not reached through hate and vitriol. It took deep courage from men and women to expose lies, to speak truth to power, but most importantly to tell their stories. It was not about the one man, Nelson Mandela, but the many together waking up to an alternative future that was fairer for everybody. In the battle for civil rights in the USA, a nation was awakened to the reality of injustice within its own borders. The story of one woman, Rosa Parks, who refused to be humiliated on a bus became a people movement as numerous as the stars, shining together for an altogether different day. In Rwanda, after the appalling genocide, those who lost everything, found a voice to communicate to their very oppressors, those who had raped and murdered their own families, not only their story, but forgiveness for the atrocities caused and found a way through to a new future. If we want peace and a better future for everybody, then we need to face up to our reality, be willing to really listen and then find that together we can embrace a new future.

 

We have an apartheid of globalisation and free market capitalism across the entire world. Every day, the gap between the rich and the poor is widened. Our entire economic system, founded on the oppression of Empire through expansion (via military violence), the creation of debt (through an errant banking system) and the rule of law (held in place by the state of the exception) is no longer fit for purpose. We see it in the plight of refugees stuck between war and barbed wire fences in a land they cannot call their own. We see it in the disproportionate imprisonment of Black American males in the USA. We see it in the vile island detention centres of Australia. We see it in the slums of New Delhi, the townships of sub-Saharan Africa and the Favelas of South America – in the eyes of children dying from such ridiculous things as diarrhoea and starvation. We encounter it in the streets of Athens and the public squares of Madrid. And yes, we find it in the midst of our NHS and social care system. Our world as we have known it is broken and no matter how much sticky tape or wrapping paper we apply, the centre simply cannot hold. The core is unstable. Everything is shaking. We must have the courage to let go of what we have known and embrace an altogether different future, a future that is fairer for everybody, where things don’t simply trickle down to the poorest, but in which the balances are re-set.

 

We have become slaves of the ‘free market’, fodder of the beast that requires ever more of us. What lies underneath the row over Junior Doctor pay and the forthcoming strikes is a great gaping hole that scares the hell out of many of us. Oh, we can sling mud until the cows come home, but it’s not going to get us anywhere. Top down, pyramidal, heroic leadership that stays its course and demands it’s own way is simply not going to cut the mustard. We must have some brave and difficult conversations about the detrimental effects of making policy from the safety of ivory towers, and learn to really listen to the stories of those affected. We have so much to learn from the Leeds Poverty Truth Challenge, the Homeless Charter in Manchester, the Community Conversations in Morecambe Bay, the Cities of Refuge initiative, the Civil Rights movements, the Mediation work done in Rwanda…..we don’t have the answers right now. The problems facing the NHS are fare more complex than trying to ensure an undeliverable manifesto promise is outworked. We need humility on all sides, collaboration and partnership.

 

It goes deeper than people right across the UK needing to manage their own health and wellbeing more effectively. It is more complex than needing to recognise where there is waste and dealing with it. It isn’t just as straight forward as needing to talk about chronic under-funding and under-recruitment. We face an existential crisis, an ontological question about the future of humanity together. Resting back onto familiar ways of operating or antiquated leadership styles will simply not work for us any more. The black hole we face is either a death or the opportunity for re-birth. A squeeze that will force us into something new. We can’t keep dancing around it forever. We must take the plunge, accept that there is no going back and see what new creation we might just co-create with Love on the other side. Don’t be afraid…….there is light at the other end of the tunnel.

 

Share This:

Share

Better Care Together – We Have to Fix the IT

iu-4In all the places I have seen an ability to try something radical and new in the sphere of health and social care (Valencia and Arkansas being two prime examples), I have witnessed one key component. They have fixed the IT! It is really not beyond the wit of man, though I accept it is not altogether straightforward. However without it, change is painfully slow and it is extremely difficult to make the kind of changes we need to see. I do not understand why the Government will not invest in this area appropriately. Here in Morecambe Bay we need to crack this nut if we’re going to be able to let go of our past and embrace a truly collaborative and integrated way of working.

 

The benefits to everybody would be huge. Patients would have safer, more streamlined and ultimately more affordable care. This would cut the complaint and litigation culture to an absolute minimum. Clinicians would be able to work far more collaboratively, effectively, safely and efficiently. If we allow ourselves to imagine just what a difference it could make then we will act to make this a reality.

 

There have been some great strides forward made here by the excellent work of GPs like Tim Reynard and George Dingle, who are developing some fantastic new ways of working and building relationships between primary and secondary care. But their efforts are being hampered by a lack of a truly integrated system.

 

As just one example, take the referral process. If a patient comes to me asking for a referral, which may also require some complex tests to help reach a diagnosis, currently there is so much wasted time and effort plus duplication of work that it is an absolute farce. Say someone comes to see me with a suspected rheumatological condition. Currently, I can see them, assess them, order some (but not all tests) and then refer them. My notes will be on my computer system, but my letter to the consultant may not fully convey all the intricacies of the history I have taken over weeks. My letter has to be written and sent off (on occasion they get lost in the system, causing huge frustration to the patient). Then the consultant sees them……..she will probably order further tests, which she will then write to me to organise, or have them done at the hospital, then she will see the patient again. She will then start some treatment, but will write to me to prescribe it and then the patient will then come to collect it from my surgery. She also asks me to refer onto our community physio teams (a letter I read at 7pm after 11 hours of non-stop work, when I want to get home for my kids’ bedtime stories). There are several points of frustration for everybody involved in the process, not least the patient with wasted time and resources along the way (plus extra letters to answer complaints for missed referrals or whatever else might go wrong).

 

In an integrated system, the patient sees me. I write good and detailed notes, which I link to the consultant rheumatologist, assigned to work alongside my practice, Unknown-5with a short note attached. She then liaises with me in a straightforward way about the case, decides what extra tests are required and these are organised (within appropriate resource allocation) ahead of the consultation. The consultant sees the patient, with a full history and set of investigations. She agrees a treatment course with the patient, prescribes the necessary drugs, which automatically appear in the electronic record, so my team can print out the prescription and the patient can pick it up. She also simultaneously links her consultation to the community physio with a short note and her therapy can be arranged in a slick and easy fashion. This has saved loads of steps, time, energy, complexity and errors. It is a basic example. There are many more areas, like maternity care, patients with complex medical problems involving the care of multiple departments etc where this is simply a no brainer.

 

So what is stopping us? Actually it’s pretty straight forward. 1) A lack of sensible and adequate resourcing from the government within the Vanguard system, which would allow us to make significant changes in a small amount of time. Instead of concentrating on a few Vanguard sites and allowing us to really flourish, things have become far too watered down across way too many experimental initiatives and the funding promised has not been made available. This really needs to be rectified. I’m sure there are things we could also streamline within our Accountable Care System. 2) Stupid competition laws and sweeteners offered to some of our partner providers to use certain IT systems which are clunky and unfriendly when it comes to creating platforms that can talk to each other, have slowed us down. We need a focused and joined-up approach. 3) Priorities. My argument is that without integrating the IT fully and investing in front end smart IT that promotes self care and more appropriate use of resources, we will not achieve together what we could in a way that will benefit everybody.

 

In short, we need to fix the IT. It is the solution to a vast majority of our problems and will allow us to really have Better Care Together.

Share This:

Share

Collaborating for the Future of the NHS

imgresThe NHS is a national treasure. And we all know, (because the media tells us again and again) that it is failing and our metanarrative is becoming one of crisis, inaffordablity and criticism of poor care. We want to keep it, save it and make it sustainable for the future. But there is a major problem. We simply cannot agree from our differing political positions how to make this happen. And no one perspective can be the whole truth and nothing but the truth and yet each ideology is so entrenched that rather than working creatively to find solutions together (as was called for again this week by MPs of 3 different parties), there is an ever more pathetic mud-slinging match and deepening suspicion of the ‘other’, which will do nothing to help us collaborate in creating a truly amazing, sustainable, affordable and accessible health and social care service for the generations to come.

I am about to caricature and overstate the various positions.

 

iu-1The Tories believe in a small state and the devolution of powers. They would see the NHS being broken up into regions which might be able to work more effectively in networks. They believe in order to have a strong NHS, we must have a strong economy. In order to have a strong economy, we must create wealth through private business, have low taxes, increase austerity and shrink the public sector. Ideologically they believe in a free trade market and that the NHS should be subject to the same free market forces as any other kind of business, which is why they like the TTIP. They believe that the NHS is only sustainable if run by private companies, who they think will do a more ‘efficient’ job than the current management structures – and yet they can point to shining examples of those who do it extremely well under the current operational system, like Salford Royal. They believe competition drives up excellence. They believe in personal responsibility in determining ones own health. They believe that clinicians should have more leadership in the NHS. In order to make the NHS sustainable, however, they want to invest £8 billion over 5 years whilst making efficiency savings (which are different to cuts, you understand) of £12 billion.

iu-2Labour (of which I confess to being a member) is currently more split ideologically. Some veer more to the centre ground arguing for a mixture of public and private provision of services, whereas others believe it must all remain public at any cost. There is huge suspicion of the private sector which is thought not to be compatible with delivering healthcare in a caring or compassionate way as it cares more about profit than people. Labour love targets and management structures to monitor everything that happens, which the Tories say is a waste of money. In order to fund the NHS, Labour believe in higher taxes, especially of big business and the rich.

The Greens and the SNP would also sit to the left side of healthcare provision whilst the Liberals are a bit of a pick and mix bag and partnered with the Tories in the top-down reorganisation we were promised wouldn’t happen but ideologically are probably closer to Labour! They do place more emphasis than anyone else on improving mental health services.

There are also outside forces at work – the Royal Colleges, the Research Networks and NICE all prescribing, in their own ways, the kind of healthcare that needs to be provided in order to meet standards of excellence – all of which has huge implications on the structuring and affordability of certain models of care. Then of course are the other nettles no-one is really ready to grasp. Tobacco has been tackled to some extent, but when it comes to alcohol, sugar, fast food, exercise in school and some people’s complete abuse of the system, they haven’t played ball. Nor is there a clear plan about what to do about the staffing crisis and the fact that in a free market, if you’re not competitive, some of your workers will move to areas where they get paid a lot more money for less work and less stress. And then there are the cultural issues, general chaos and shoddy systems rampant throughout the NHS and Social Care that requires an altogether different kind of leadership for them to be addressed. Oh yeah – plus it’s really expensive, but we still invest less of our GDP into our health system than most other OECD countries.

Yikes! What shall we do? Who’s right? Who’s wrong? What pearls of wisdom can we draw on from each perspective to find a way through? We probably do need devolution to the regions, so that we avoid the trap of a London-centric or South-favoured economy, whilst maintaining some accountability, especially for appropriate provision and distribution of resource with the Secretary of State. We do need to encourage more personal and social responsibility whilst ensuring we protect services for the most vulnerable and deprived populations. WE need to provide fare more resource into mental health services. We need to work with the high standards of research and be pragmatic in our approach to delivering them in reality.

The NHS, the largest of all political footballs, must somehow be de-politicised (in the sense of the old politics). Each new government with its successive and extremely costly reorganisations disrupts and destroys the excellent work done in the preceding 5 year cycle. If the NHS is ever going to work and be affordable, collaboration and not competition is the only way.

There isn’t a perfect model, but we need to keep aligning to the vision.

iuThe vision is to deliver continuously improving, high quality and compassionate health and social care to all in our communities. We really are going to have to collaborate together, taking the best of all our ideas in order to make this happen. This isn’t about winning a political argument. This is about being real and pragmatic together in finding a way through the current dross of all our fallings out for the sake of a future health and social care system that works for everybody.

There is one of the beatitudes I’ve been thinking a lot about recently: “You areiu-3 blessed when you can show people how to cooperate instead of compete or fight.” We have to learn a new style of politics over the NHS that is about co-operation. One that operates out of a different kind of spirit. Humility, kindness and compassion are our keys in learning this new way together.

Share This:

Share

Changing the Culture of the NHS

imgresI had the very real privilege of listening to and interacting with Prof Mike West of the Kings Fund as part of a Cumbria Wide learning collaborative a few days ago. It was utterly engaging and inspiring. His basic strap line is this: “The vision of health and social care is to deliver continuously improving, high quality and compassionate health care to all in our community.” The problem is that we’re not doing this, and we’re not doing this because there is something deeply wrong in our culture. And so how do we change a system, especially when it feels that the odds are seriously against us? How do we recover compassion? How do we envision a floundering workforce and help them to believe? Why are there some beacons of light in each organisation and some really dark holes? Why are we not learning more readily from areas of good practice and challenging those that are way below par?

 

There are some seriously problematic things for us to face up to, and although I love to take a ‘solutions-focused’ approach, I do believe that sometimes you have to face up to your reality before you decide to move into a different kind of future. We could talk until the cows come home about the potential dismantling of the NHS, the low morale of staff and this ‘black hole’ of debt. But what I want to focus on in this post is the cultural deficit. Previous governments have tried to address this with targets, competition and inspections, but each of these, although I think introduced with good intentions, have backfired spectacularly and driven morale lower without improving the culture at all.

 

imgresStress is defined by Mike West as a poisonous concoction of high work demand, low control and poor support. Chronic high stress levels are significantly higher in the NHS (26.8%) compared to any other sector (17.8% on average). High stress is detrimental for people’s health and a well known cause of early death. And so in an organisation in which we have 1.4 million people spending on average 80000 hours of their lives caring for other people, we are literally killing them by not caring for them. This is a paradox in an organisation which is supposed to have compassion at its core. And yet we know through significant evidence that the lower the morale and health of your team, the worse the outcomes for patients will be. Stress in the NHS and the lack of compassion with which we treat our own staff is a more significant health risk to the population than many of the issues that we give far more attention to.

 

So, what can we do? Are we doomed to serve systems that de-humanise people and devour them like bread? Must a system be driven by what Foucault calls ‘biopower’, ie using human beings as the fodder to drive the machine? Can the systems be harnessed and redeemed and made to work for us rather than served by us? Yes! I can say that this is happening here in Morecambe Bay and I see evidence of it in many areas. Nationally, we can take comfort from 2 things, in particular. Firstly, although the truth about our current culture is uncomfortable, the truth is now available to all, so change really can happen. Secondly, the vast majority of people genuinely want the culture to change and the dominant minority in the centre of toxic cultures can no longer hold. Mike West says systems can change, and he has gathered some good evidence to back this up. But it takes time (5-6 years), it takes focus and it takes consistency. He breaks cultural change down into 6 key elements that are well worth exploring.

 

6 Key Elements of Cultural Change

 

1) Vision, values and strategy. It is absolutely vital in order for a culture to change that the direction of travel is obvious to all. Salford Royal Hospital in Manchester have for years had the same vision statement: “To be the safest hospital in England”, and they have done it! A vision has to be clear, it imgreshas to mark ambition for the future and be able to guide and inspire the whole organisation towards change. However, it takes 5-6 years to embed this through an organisation. So those who communicate a vision to staff and then wonder why they haven’t got it yet need to understand that a paradigm shift in thinking doesn’t happen overnight. A change in direction of the rudder doesn’t turn the ship in one go. The vision needs to be communicated multiple times in multiple ways to multiple audiences. It needs to be inspiring, owned by all and makes clear commitments to the direction of travel.

 

2) Clearly aligned goals at every level. If a vision is to be cast, there must be measurable goals along the way, so that a team knows they are heading in the right direction. These goals have 2 key elements. Firstly they must be clear and achievable (so not more than 5 or 6). Secondly, they must be aligned to vision, measurable and challenging. People must be challenged to reach an objective, so that the process is both stretching and fun, and there needs to be celebration of goals being reached along the way. Problems emerge here when leaders don’t want to hear about problems that are being encountered. The team needs to be responsive to barriers. For example, there is no point wasting time and energy on collecting data for the sake of it. We want to collect data that actually helps improve patient care or helps staff do their job more effectively. If we want our staff to treat people with care and dignity, then we must treat our staff with care and dignity and that means listening to them and responding to them as we head into uncharted waters.

 

3) Leaders need to manage and engage with their staff well to gain high quality care. The high level ofimgres chronic stress in NHS staff proves that this is not happening as well as it needs to. The Kings fund have discovered some key themes from their research in this area: a) patient satisfaction rates are far higher where staff have clear goals and are working together as a team to achieve them, b) staff views of their leaders is directly linked to patients’ views of care quality, c) staff satisfaction/commitment predicts patient satisfaction, d) if staff feel high work pressure, low control over this and low support then patients will also report low staffing numbers, insufficient support, privacy and respect, e) poor staff health and well-being is directly linked to high injury and mortality rates, and good HR practices lead to lower and decreasing levels of patient imgresmortality. Another key factor is the reduction of hierarchy. The John Lewis Partnership has consistently had the highest level of staff morale for the last 180 years. one key factor is this: there are only 3 levels of hierarchy – CEO/board/partners. Staff/partners feel empowered to make changes and they are listened to.

 

We are not managing our staff well in the NHS. 24% of staff report regular bullying by ‘management. Discrimination is higher especially for those of Black-African and Black Afro-Caribbean descent. It is still high for those from Asia and 18 times higher for Muslims than for any other group and is also high for those who are not ‘heterosexual’. If you have white skin, you are three times more likely to be imgrespromoted into senior leadership positions, when account for numbers is made. And despite the suffragettes we continue to see discrimination against women in certain specialties, most notably, surgery. This is not an acceptable culture. We need to change the culture. Leaders need to learn to be present for their team. Mike West puts it so well: “Leaders need to learn to listen, with kind eyes, full of care and fascination (just as we would want our patients to be listened to). We need to learn empathy, to communicate well and take intelligent action.” Engagement with our teams is about really engaging at an emotional level and this takes trust. Our management styles must change towards being far more inclusive, empowering and under-girded with our values and integrity. For staff to feel happy, there needs to be a sense of a stable senior leadership team. There should be a real sense of anger about how badly staff in the NHS are currently treated but a clear positive attitude towards affecting change. Leaders must help process negative emotion in their teams and deal with quarrelsome, disruptive behaviour that spoils the hope for a different future. Poor performance and attitude has to be challenged if we are to create the kind of culture we need and want to see.

 

There are many situations and systems in which an entire culture can be toxic, with top down bullying as the order of the day. Creating resilience in our teams is not about toughening people up to go back into toxic situations until they finally break. No, we need something far more creative than this. It is impossible to change a culture as a lone shark. Mike West talked about gaining ‘minority imgresinfluence’ – good examples of this are found in the Feminist movement and the Green Party. A small group of committed and determined people can accomplish an incredible amount. But if the culture will not change, then wipe the dust off your feet and go and give your energy elsewhere. Systems can change if there is desire enough to change them. There are hospital trusts in the UK that report significantly higher staff morale than anywhere else. We must learn from places like Salford Royal, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals, St Helen’s and Knowsley, Bedford and Frimley Park. Here in Morecambe Bay, where the maternity service has been at rock bottom, we are part way through an incredible cultural shift and many other departments throughout the country are beginning to turn here and ask us what we’re learning in our journey of change.

 

4) Learning, Quality Improvement and Innovation. This is a very straight forward point, but one to which we do not pay enough attention. Learning organisations facilitate the learning of all staff and the system itself to continuously improve. If we’re not improving, we are going backwards. We must learn to learn from failures and create a culture where this is acceptable. Learning organisations are characterized by systems thinking with information systems that can measure performance. In such a system, staff are encouraged and motivated to focus on improving quality (why would we want to do a shoddy job?). Learning is done in teams and crosses the boundaries of role and specialization and there is always dialogue going on around this. Prof West says that a key question to continually ask is this: “What do we need to change around here to enable you to be able to do your job more effectively?” We must make a promise to learn and a commitment to act. Where staff have a focus on continually improving patient care and this is embedded in the culture, targets become obsolete. Reflective practice and learning becomes endemic. All staff are accountable and all staff are enabled and empowered to bring about change.

 

5) Team working. Teams need clear objectives, roles, communication and learning. In the NHS, 5% of people say they do not work in a team. 40% of people feel they work in an effective team. That leaves 55% of people who consider the team they work in to be dysfunctional. Stress, injury, bullying and errors are all higher in ‘pseudo-teams’ and the mortality rates are significantly lower for patients who are cared for by teams that function well. Interpersonal conflict is a disaster for effective team and inter-team working. The imgresKirkup report into Morecambe Bay and the Francis report into Stafford both highlight the appalling and detrimental effects of the breakdown of relationship between consultants and hospital departments.  It is estimated that up to 30000 deaths per year could be prevented by more effective team working. This conversation really matters! We have to change our culture.

 

To develop good teams, we must encourage positive and supportive relationships, resolve and prevent conflicts, create a positive group attitude to diversity, be attentive and really listen to our teams, encourage inter-team cooperation and nurture team learning improvement and innovation. Our teams must develop reflexivity. Teams are more effective and innovative to the extent to which they take time out to reflect upon their objectives, strategies, processes and environments and make changes accordingly. The best response to pressure is not to work even harder, but to stop, take a step back and reflect. This is true even in emergency situations, as evidenced by the pilot who handed over the controls to his co-pilot whilst he took time to assimilate his options and decide on a strategy to land US Airways flight 1549 in the Hudson river in 2009.

 

iu-46) Collective Leadership. Leadership is the responsibility of all. It is for anyone with any kind of expertise to take responsibility where and when appropriate. Leadership is shared in teams across the whole community. It is interdependent and collaborative, working together to ensure high quality health and social care. This is our experience through Better Care Together in Morecambe Bay. It needs to be both clinical and managerial. The more hierarchy there is, the less opportunity there is to innovate. There are lessons for us to learn from more collaborative leadership styles like ‘The Art of Hosting’. We would do well, to take heed and learn some vital lessons from teams daring to do things differently.images

 

Mike West finished his lecture with a very beautiful summary: Health and Social Care is about the core value of compassion. We want to create compassionate communities that listen with fascination and are empathic. We have to begin with ourselves. We need to take intelligent actions around this so that we can create the kind of cultures we want to see.

Share This:

Share

Integration and Collaboration

In my opinion there are two main systemic barriers to providing great health care on the NHS, currently (there are other ones also but in terms of the system itself – these are the two biggest). The answer to overcoming them btw is not privatisation via the TTIP. I like to look for solutions to problems, rather than focus on the negative….

So, firstly (and it really isn’t that hard to do, it just requires some funding, which in the medium/long term would be money seriously well spent):

 

iuAmalgamate patient electronic records and share them across the system. There is so much time/money wasted and clinical errors made because of this very easy to solve issue. I’m sure there are reasons why citizens may feel concerned and I really do understand them, but given the great work already going on in Tameside at the hands of the excellent, Dr Amir Hannan, and the positive feedback from patients, this needs to rolled out as far and wide as possible.

It helps patients feel more able to manage their own health conditions and ensures notes are always available at each consultation. It means medication changes are managed more safely and effectively and information is shared between professionals in a timely way.

 

And secondly:

iuBreak down the silo mentality and reality of the various care organisations. Breaking down the walls that prevent effective team working and amalgamating the budgets of health and social care will be a huge breakthrough for care. We are already seeing this with the establishment of Integrated Care Teams within general practice. The teams comprise of: GPs, Community Matrons, District Nurses, Community Therapists, Midwives, Health Visitors, Mental Health Teams, Social Workers, the Police, the Fire brigade, and a Care Co-ordinator to pull it all together. If you also throw into the mix third sector organisations aligned with practices and patient volunteers, you have an amazing force for good!

 

There are some warnings to put in place. Manchester, which is the first place to really try this under ‘Devo Manc’ is having a huge overall budget cut (20%) as it launches into it. The hope is that by working more collaboratively and in an integrated way, savings will be made. But the ‘Save our NHS’ group have some major misgivings.

 

 

If you wanted to know more about the details of DevoManc and the health impacts of that. You can find the Memorandum of Understanding here: http://www.nhshistory.net/mou%20(1).pdf and the Five Year Forward View here: http://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/5yfv-web.pdf
Innovative collaboration and integration of our health and social services does not have to mean the privatisation of them. But if the TTIP comes into effect, despite huge public opposition, then the NHS as we have known it will be over. IMO the TTIP deserves a full referendum by the people of Europe. If you don’t know about the TTIP, you need to, and you should seriously think about writing to your MEP to tell them why this deal needs to be stopped.

[1] Independent: What is TTIP? And six reasons why it should scare you:
http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/what-is-ttip-and-six-reasons-why-the-answer-should-scare-you-9779688.html
Huffington Post: Corporate Courts — A Big Red Flag on ‘Trade’ Agreements:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dave-johnson/corporate-courts—-a-big_b_5826490.html
[2] MEPs will be voting on a resolution on TTIP in Strasbourg on June 10th. It’s not a legally binding vote, but what MEPs decide will send a strong message back to the European Commission about where we all stand on TTIP. If there’s enough opposition, especially to the worst parts of TTIP, it could damage the deal for good:
Euractiv: What will Parliamentarians vote on TTIP?
http://www.euractiv.com/sections/trade-society/what-will-eu-parliamentarians-vote-ttip-313845
[3] You can find out more about the European Citizens Initiative and who’s involved here:
https://stop-ttip.org/

 

If you want to, you can sign a petition here:

https://secure.38degrees.org.uk/page/s/eu-ttip-petition#petition

 

We need to continue with the kind of healthcare we actually believe in, improving it where this needs to happen, without it being stolen from those who need it most because of greedy trade deals.

 

Share This:

Share