Staying Well During Lockdown

This time of Lockdown and Social Distancing, due to COVID-19 is not easy. It can have a significantly negative impact on our mental, physical, and emotional health and wellbeing. Difficult conversations are being had, isolation and loneliness are really tough and it’s particularly hard that we don’t know how long this period may last.

 

In this video, I share some ideas of the kind of things that can help us stay well. It’s by no means an exhaustive list, but hopefully helps us think about how we can stay well individually whilst also looking out for our neighbours. None of this is easy, but whilst we’re staying home to suppress the virus, stop the spread and give our health (and other front line) services the best chance of caring for people, we need to ensure we stay healthy and well, whilst building our strength and resilience. Together we can!

 

 

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The NHS as an Anchor Institution

The Preston Model of economics has set many heads turning and tongues wagging! If you don’t know the story, it is well worth reading about, as it offers much hope for the future. Alternatively, you can hear Cllr Matthew Brown talking about it here.

 

If the NHS really took on board what it means to be an anchor institution, as the largest employer in the UK, it could have a seismic effect on the economy, the environment, the health and wellbeing of the people and social justice. It is well within the gift and grasp of the NHS for this to become a reality, both locally and nationally and would involve some basic and fairly straightforward changes (and some more slightly complex ones!) Here is a starter for 10:

 

1) Pay everyone in the NHS a living wage

2) Reinvest the NHS pension pot, taking it out of global corporations or off shore tax havens and instead putting it into local infrastructure and regeneration schemes

3) Ensure the physical and mental health and wellbeing of all staff, through developing the 5 ways to wellbeing in the work place and leading by example by ensuring healthy food options for patients and staff. This could also include all staff having 1/2 day per month to volunteer with local charities, communities and schools around health and wellbeing initiatives

4) Create positive discrimination to employ people and offer apprenticeships/training opportunities to people from more economically deprived neighbourhoods (as per Oldham) to help generate more economic wellbeing

5) Only procure from local/regional companies, again to improve local investment and ensure these companies also have a good health and wellbeing strategy for their own staff

6) Take responsibility for developing a green strategy

7) Join with other large local employers to develop this wider strategy and economic development plan, e.g around green transport, job creation and supporting worker cooperatives – this needs to include local councils and universities

8) Be part of the new local bank/credit unions being set up so that new banking systems are more accountable

9) Work with local schools which are struggling, and create healthy school partnerships which both secure the wellbeing of future generations and can create a more committed and secure workforce through new training schemes

10) Support the community voluntary and faith sector with both practical resource and infrastructure support through the primary care networks and integrated partnerships

 

This is by no means an exhaustive list, just a few examples. Imagine, though, what a huge difference it would make if NHS England, every Integrated Care System, each Integrated Care Partnership and every Primary Care Network adopted this kind of plan. We might focus less on the effects of poverty on health and more on what we can do to make a difference to it, because we would be a part of generating wealth and improving health! This takes the NHS into the doughnut and creates an economy of wellbeing – why wouldn’t we do this?! It’s easy to understand and not too hard to implement!

 

 

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Changing the Future of Adverse Childhood Experiences

Tweet Applying a Population Health Approach to Adverse Childhood Experiences   Adverse Childhood Experiences are one of our most important Population Health issues due to their long lasting impact on the physical, mental and emotional health and wellbeing of a person and indeed the wider community. It is therefore really important that we apply a [Continue Reading …]

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Facing Our Past, Finding a Better Future – Adverse Childhood Experiences

Tweet This week I had the privilege of listening to Prof Warren Larkin, advisor to the Department of Health on Adverse Childhood Experiences. This is something I’ve written about on this blog before and Warren has made me more determined than ever to keep talking about this profoundly important issue. This blog draws on his [Continue Reading …]

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Why Are We So Inactive in the North West?

Tweet So, I was interviewed on BBC News 24 on Monday evening (sorry for the poor visual quality), to talk about why it is that we are so inactive in the North West (worst in the country, apparently at 47% being inactive). We have also pretty much the worst health outcomes, with high rates of [Continue Reading …]

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The Morecambe Bay Mile A Day!

Tweet Every day in Morecambe Bay 2000 children aged 4-11 run a mile a day (how fantastic is that?!). Inspired initially by the story from Stirling, the word  is spreading and we now have another 3000 children starting across Lancashire. Our early data shows that there has been a dramatic improvement in the children’s health, [Continue Reading …]

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Our Nation’s Biggest Public Health Problem

Tweet The subject of this blog is sensitive and difficult. It may stir up some difficult issues or memories for you, as you read. If this happens, then please take time to seek the help you need. I believe this blog and ones to follow might be some of the most important I have written to [Continue Reading …]

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The Extraordinary (Healing) Power of Forgiveness

Tweet There are many times when people come to see me, as a GP, and I cannot find a physical cause for their pain. There are various other conditions when people have what we call “medically unexplained symptoms”. For others, they can get stuck in a rut with their mental health and feel unable to [Continue Reading …]

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Morecambe Bay – Better Care Together

Tweet Morecambe Bay   Known for it’s fast moving tides, mud flats, quicksands, islands, rare birds, natural gas, submarine building and nuclear power; Morecambe Bay is a place whose motto is “where beauty surrounds and health abounds”. The first part is true – it is a place with some of the most spectacular views on [Continue Reading …]

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How Healthy Are You?

Tweet An NHS health check is available to all 40-74 year old citizens of the UK. The idea is to detect problems like hypertension, (pre)diabetes and the risk of heart disease early so that preventative measures – lifestyle changes and possibly medication – can be offered in good time.   There is plenty of debate [Continue Reading …]

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